Mission

Our mission is two-fold:

1. To educate and support individuals toward a conscious, peaceful transition

2. To empower and guide families to reclaim the healing ritual of a home funeral

 

1  For most people, the very thought of dying provokes fear and dread. As a culture, we deny the natural process of aging and death and focus on prolonging life at all costs. Sadly, that cost is often the price of a peaceful, natural, even joyful transition.

When we prepare ourselves spiritually, emotionally and mentally for our final transition, we intuitively know when the time comes to let go. Then we can say ‘no thank you’ to life support and welcome death support.

Dying consciously with grace, acceptance and a sense of fulfillment is the greatest gift we can leave our loved-ones.

 

“Someone who’s dying has a job in front of them, and their job description is to die extravagantly – to set the banquet table that should be spilled in the wake of their dying, where everyone around them who knew them, or didn’t know them, or who wanted to, are invited, and the storytelling that ensues is the feast”         – Stephen Jenkinson

 

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2. Caring for our loved ones between the time of death and burial or cremation, is an ancient tradition that can be traced to earliest civilizations. During the past 100 years however, this once family-directed tradition has been gradually taken over by professional funeral directors.

Today, having lost the comforting rituals surrounding the death of a loved-one, we are often left feeling helpless and overwhelmed. Fearful of a process we know little or nothing about, we surrender the responsibility of after-death care to those who ‘know what to do.’

Our loved-one is taken away and refrigerated while documentation is prepared. The body is embalmed with toxic chemicals and laid in unfamiliar surroundings where we are invited to visit under restricted conditions. Sadly, we have become detached from the most poignant time in the circle of life. We have forgotten how precious it is to claim a final period of intimacy in a sacred space amid loving friends and family members. We have forgotten the cultural and religious reasons for sitting in vigil with a beloved, and the profound opportunity for healing and closure this ritual provides.


Caring for a loved-one’s body after death at home for a period of one to three days ,allows friends and family the time, space and privacy to process feelings, honor religious customs, be supported by the community, and begin the healing process.